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story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
with the resources at hand. -- >> the c.s. becoming like greece? >> no, that is a profoundly -- do you see as becoming like greece? >> that is a profoundly different situation. the congressional budget office says that if we stay on the course we are on, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product of the the next 20 years. most experts say once you get a debt of more than 9% of gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth in a significant way. this is just about -- not just about numbers on page, it is really about opportunities for people. whether you will be able to send your kid to school, to college, whether it will be able to buy a car, my house, whether we will have economic opportunity for the people of the country. the best academic research that has been done shows that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talk
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
reached on the banking up. it's integrity is good for the agreement and as we focus on greece today, conditions are in place to disburse the next tranche of aid to greece totalling 43 billion euros. >>> over to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoratio
this administration. we have to reduce spending. we are heading down the same path that greece did. right now the democrats are talking about raising taxes on the top 2%. if we do not stop the spending, we will be back here again maybe one year from now saying, maybe we need to raise taxes on the top 25% or 50%. then everybody will be taxed and we will run out of money. what is going to happen is the federal government is not going to be able to take care of its obligations. you are not going to be able to have safety nets. social security and medicare are going broke. we have to fix those of those who are dependent on those systems can get them. continuing to spend money like both parties have been doing the, wild spending is going to lead us to be just like greece. we are not going to be able to take care of the poor or the needy or take care of senior citizens. we have to stop spending. host: this is fiscal year 2010, but it has not changed significantly in terms of percentage. 41% of the federal budget. not defense appropriations 19%. defense spending 20%. the national debt 6%. we're in t
sides warning they may go the way of greece. taking away two different lessons. who has it right? our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? i had[ designer ]eeling enough of just covering up day! my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin.
ban them and it -- >> greg: the funny thing is we talk about greece, but before there was greece, there was detroit. detroit is greece. if it was only the acropolis. dead city. people left because they couldn't make a living, the unions suffocate pod tenial. >> bob: true about toledo and cleveland and cincinnati? the northern cities that have had bleed of workers? >> eric: i will make a wage with you. now that snyder signs it off and right to work, i bet an auto company goes -- brand new, never done business before in detroit. >> kimberly: you will lose this bet, bob. >> eric: coming up, 2004 south korean singer rapped about killing americans in 2019 and is invited to perform for president obama. ♪ ♪ >> eric: maybe not. we will gangmam bang it out next. and make sure you go to the facebook page. we are updating and posting facebook.com/thefivefnc. click like. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only
the arts in schools. more than a christmas play is a play. one of my favorite times in school. greece, we did greece in the -- grease, we did greece -- grease in my class. and i was kinicki. >> can you do that? >> i need the wig. >> i played rizzo and i didn't need the wig of the. >> you're welcome. >> patrick, i didn't really understand or agree with your argument, you said something about because joe success was a historical figure. but that has nothing to do with what christmas celebrates. it is celebrating the birth of the son of god. >> but the point is, there is a historically relevant component to that for nonchristians. people who do not claim to be christians or are not christians their eyes will not burn out of their head by watching something that does that. >> jesus in a manger. >> but the entire point of christmas is that jesus is the son of god. it is not that he was a man. >> the point of christmas, jesus the son of god was born that day. >> right, exactly. the son of god. i'm confused. >> you are trying to have a fight about jesus christ. >> i am not having a fight about i
into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the british were ruthless. that is another point. people say look at what stalin did in poland. he broke the altar. i don't believe they did. i will tell you more about that. look what the british did. but we did increase in the cold war period, the early cold war period we and the truman doctrine of 47 to 49, we had american advisers and early vietnam there were already over increase read the the british coal is truly to get back the mediterranean, along the region's coming get iran back in the conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it's crucial. we showed that in the beautiful maps. he gets to the far east and it is the richest resources around known to britain, not us. so then it isn't -- you can't dhaka the u.s. soviet relations without talki
and stalin in october of 44. dividing up -- the british forget 90% of greece and the russians would get 90% of bulgaria and hungary and they divided up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of 45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disagreements with the russians but we end up resolving them. so let's not make a big deal. there's no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there on april 12, 1945, immediately takes a different course. roosevelts alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still strong at that point the truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place and didn't pay heed to. people like burns and second day he flies burns through his private plane and burns gets german the same message. the soviets are breaking all of their agreements and they can't be trusted. and so what we are going to see is within two weeks the u.s. policy toward the soviet union's going to change in april 1945. by the time there's the big meeting on april 23 with molotov and on apr
at greece, greece has been very adept at increasing their debt ceiling. now they have 25% unemployment. there are people who can't even finds jobs in cities are having to move out according to press reports to rural areas. that could be our future. as tom said, if you gave the president every job forming tax increase that he's asked for, it's about 3% of the spending. and the president himself has said that the drivers of our debt are medicare, medicaid and health care. nothing else comes close. >> congresswoman stabenow pointed out -- >> you have to deal with the structural reforms to our entitlement spending. protecting current seniors but helping to insure my 10-year-old daughter and 9-year-old son that these programs are around for them. >> medicare savings, lot of republicans not you but a lot of republicans in the last campaign including mitt romney ran against. >> well, george, first of all, the $700 billion in savings doesn't save the government a penny, it takes that and spends it on other people. what -- it's really important that people look. the government is twice the size
. the promise of another bail out funding for greece is keeping the market stable. let's get a check on tokyo markets. on the tokyo foreign exchange the dollar is trading in a narrow bend. that's 82.53 to 55. traders would like to confirm how the u.s. is performing. it's now back above the 107 levels. 107.05 to 10. let's take a look at stocks. japanese share prices are a little change. the nikkei trading above the 9,000 mark. 9,558 so far this morning. looks like everyone is waiting for the u.s. jobs data. let's take a look at the jobs market in the asia pacific. kospi is trading at the central bank's role has become a key focus in japan's general election. the leaders othe ruling party have expressed contrasting views on what the bank of japan can and should do. our business reporter spoke with two economists for their take on the issue. >> translator: debate had heated up ever since banks were urged to take strong action. >> translator: we will boost public spending. that's going to force new money into the market. this will have a positive effect on the economy. >> reporter: the comments h
greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energy's. >> solyndra. the tip of the a's spurred. dozens of companies go bad. the story behind the story. campaign contributors contributors, interest free loans from the government, distorting capital, it means resources are being used less productively and workers get lower wages and it adds up to the bad situation. john: president bush says it to oklahoma you take care of things it is good for the economy. >> collor you create a housing bubble. those people were the ones that had to walk out onto the plank then we all fall into the shark infested waters 87 tax credits. >> sounds great. but from the tax code in 1913 only 14 pages we have warped into the 702000 page monster. more than 1,000 different forms to download. nobody understands. h&r block loves it but it is a news around the neck of the american economy. every page has something in it that sounds good but look what it adds up to 27 spending. the welfare state.
and to restore growth and jobs in countries such as greece and spain. >>> a new york judge announced an agreement for the international monetary fund and housekeeper. they have accused dominique can and dominique strauss-kahn had agreed to pay $6 million. >>> officials confirmed a private plane that went down in mexico yesterday was carrying popular americans mexican singer jenny rivera. a vigil was held in southern california last night and the singer was at the peak of her fame. she was also a reality television star an advocate for domestic violence victims. she leaves behind five children and two grandchildren. >>> a nevada woman who survived said she asked her boy february not to -- boyfriend not to venture out for help after they became stuck. she said they should stay with the vehicle and ride out the storm together n an interview she said she knew she would never see him again and she was rescued six days after she and clifton became stranded in the remote valley. clifton's body was recovered the same day. >>> they are cracking down on repeat drunk drivers and we will be whapping for seve
't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put people out of work and that would have a negative effect on the economy, would it not? >> it would, adam. real quick, a bit of news here. president obama will deliver a statement at 4:45, something i imagine we'll cover live here on fox business. adam: we will. >> 5:45 president obama deliver as statement here at the white house. as far as spending cuts are concerned, you see this argument, you typically hear republicans say,
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
friday its newest ipad and ipad mini will hit stores there too. >> susie: greece is one step closer to getting $57 billion in bailout loans. german lawmakers approved the deal reached earlier this week. greece agreed to measures that will drastically reduce its debt over the next seven years. european stock markets and the euro rose on the news. here on wall street, tom, a neutral day on most people here, investors here feeling anxious over the gridlock on the fiscal cliff. the last day of trading for november kind of wimped out. >> tom: yeah, not a lot of price action. lots of volume, though, to end the month, lots of trading volume, but not a lot of price movement here. let's go ahead and take a look at the market focus with the major indices this friday. the major stock indices ended essentlly changed today even with the rhetoric out of washington. the s&p 500 spent most of the session in the red after the disappointing drop in consumer spending. the index finished with a fractional gain. trading volume spiked at the end of the month. 1.2 billion shares on the big board. just und
and the year rose own economy. we might not be in worse shape than greece but when you take germany and everybody else and put them in one community we are in worse shape than they are and we get the benefit of the doubt. we are the safe haven and people think that everything is okay because they know that we aren't going to defend because you can print money. when they realize printing is worse than defaulting because the potential for the loss is even greater then we are going to see a big spike in the interest rates and that is when we have our crisis because either the fed allows the rates to go up, and who knows how high they might have to go. let's say 10 percent in order to stop the implosion of the dollar and put an end to inflation. if we have a $20 trillion national debt when that happens that would require us to shell out $2 trillion a year of interest payments. where are we going to get that? that all of the tax. >> you mentioned the creditors. who are the creditors? especially for the united states right now. >> some are other americans who own treasury and large insura
know as america if we don't fix enitlements. we're becoming greece because of out-of-control entitlement spending. there's no age adjustment for medicare and social security. there is no means testing, of in the president's plan. we should do what ronald reagan and tip o'neill did, adjust the age for retirements, a means test benefit, do it together, and republicans should put revenues on the table and the president's plan does nothing but damn us to becomeag greece. >> schieffer: let us shift to the whole situation of the episode that happened in benghazi, that's been kind of in turmoil. what happened? how was it that an american ambassador and three other mers died there? susan rice, who many think the president was nominating to be secretary of state, was back up on capitol hill during the week. did she help or hurt her case? >> well, apparently, according to the senators she met, she didn't do herself much good. but let's just say this about benghazi-- it's just not about susan rice. it's about a system that failed. the military failed. the intelligence communi
political crisis. >>> in greece, police fended off protesters launching molotov cocktails. >>> and in the u.s., the president is taking his fiscal cliff solutions directly to the people. >>> plus, a modern-day spy story ripped from the pages of a tom clancy novel. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry and we start with breaking news out of japan. a strong 7.3-magnitude earthquake has struck off the country's northeastern coast. that's the same region hit by last year's massive earthquake and tsunami. well, this morning's quake shook buildings as far as tokyo, and there are reports of a three-foot tsunami in the miyagi prefecture. the u.s. geological survey says there's no risk of a widespread tsunami, and so far, there have been no news of injuries or damage. of course, we're going to keep an eye on any aftershocks that occur and we'll bring you the very latest. >>> well, elsewhere, all eyes are on cairo this morning as turmoil has once again overtaken egypt's capital. this time, it's in response to a politically explosive power grab by the democracy's president, mohamed morsi. right now,
on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the econom
as greece or portugal ornever, but they are just talking about a few ring keating billions. a trillion word is really unique to the united states. and i think that is what is going to kill us, the absolute numbers. germany can affo to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually th bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american family. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are presidenta taxes on our middle-class. >> the bill is passed. lou: the house passes the stem emigration
it from becoming greece. the game you're talking about is small ball. you're talking about raising the ceiling for 11 days. how about doing something big these not liberal. every idea is a liberal idea. how about manning up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> man up. with jim demint leaving, a new poll shows who they wants a his replacement. put your votes in. a very funny south carolinian. the one and only stephen colbert. the comedian miami tops the list. this is an honest poll. 20%. tim scott comes in second. colbert addressed the speculation around his potential candidacy on his show last night. >> there's already a twitter page, facebook, draft colbert website. i can tell you having done a show with him in charleston, he's an absolute rock star in that state. >> yes, i am a rock star in south carolina and not just because i ended my rally there with herman cain by biting the head off a dove. now, my network contract prohibits me from taking on another full-time job, so the sfl senate would be perfect. >>> south
's lunchbreak we're cooking with artichokes. which country cultivates the most artichokes? a. greece b. italy c. united states the answer still to come this midday! hi, i'm phil mickelson. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. serious sometimes fatal events including infections tuberculosis lymphoma, other cancers and nervous system and blood disorders have occurred. before starting enbrel your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. don't start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores have had hepatitis b have
greece and half of europe. neil: some say we'll be like greece if in is no deal by the end of the year? >> i do not agree. we have to negotiate, the presiden needs to get involved. neil: the language changed little bit today, i notice when they are not attacking each other out in open, then progress must be being made. that is what led to rumors of a potential imminent deal yesterday. now they are back to sniping, speaker boehner and nancy pelosi and others going back and forth, that leads me to believe that things are falling apart, do you get that sense? >> we see here -- hear they are negotiating, we'll get a deal, then we hear the fighting going on, if the fighting continues, we're not getting a deal. i don't want a deal if it is just the same old deal that is not good for america. neil: do you worry, as i guy has been around the neck of the woods for a few years, that republicans are losing their verve. some more conservative members ve said we lost an election but we did not los everything that we stand for, yet, everything i hear talked about, are concessions on part of the repu
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
austerity measures have prolonged. not taken that area out of recession. in greece, you often hear members of this house who say the united states economy is going to be like greece. oh, really? greece is not growing. greece has lost 25% in its economy in the past five years. greece's economy shrunk by 7% this year alone. there's a 20% unemployment rate in greece and even higher for younger people. greece doesn't make anything that the rest of the world wants. the american economy is dynamic. the american economy always needs to be improving with education, scientific research and infrastructure investment. so, a rational system, a rational political system would respond much differently than what is going on here in this congress. we're talking about spending cuts and allowing tax cuts that haven't produced economic growth to be extended. all of the people that are talking about spending did all the spending. they are the debt and deficit creators. if we want to experience economic growth we have to invest in this economy. and it's critically important to the future of this nation. medica
that didn't have. greece does not have an exit. citigroup had a 90% chance earlier this year. the biggest day of this jurn year was june 17th when they elected a moderate who did not try to pull greece out. and germany stepped up and gave them some money and that september the 6th, that was the european central bank. so you had china, maria, the united states and greece. none of them went off the cliff. maria, this is for you. our little christmas present for you, maria. >> thank you. thank you. >> we want to remember, by the way, this is emblem attic of all these nice things you have said this week for the victims of the newtown connecticut tragedy. we love the way you all have been strong in support of them. >> thank you. i very much appreciate that. michael, let me ask you, what do you want to be avoiding in 2013? >> i think you have to look at it from the standpoint of extreme. it's clearly in the bond market. it's clearly in the love for dividends. it's clearly in the love for income versus capital appreciation, versus cycle kral. i call this the rocky balboa stock market. we've had
the country from becoming greece but i'm not going to set aside the 1.2 trillion in cuts. any hope of going over the fiscal cliff must start in the senate. not one democrat would support the idea that we could protect 99% of americans from a tax increase. boehner's plan b i thought made as soon as. to my republican kcolleagues, te the ronald reagan model is if you get 80% of what you want, that's a good day. i lime simpson-bowles. the president is going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can protect 99% of the public from a tax hike that, is not a tax increase in my book. chuck, maybe you and me and some other people in the senate can find a way to find this on the short term but on the long term there's not going to be a deal any time soon. >> you think we're going to go over the cliff? >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tree. the big chance at the big deal is at the debt ceiling. that's when we'll have leverage to turn the country around, prevent from becoming greece and save social security and medicare. to anybody listening, i will raise the debt cei
becoming greece, no real reduction in our deficit or our debt. the good news, senator mccain, is that we're one big deal away from dominating the 21st century because america's problems are really less than most other places. the bad news is that that deal is elusive, it requires presidential leadership, and i haven't seen much of it, and if we say on the course we're on today, we're going to lose the american dream because your grandchildren and your children cannot pay off the debt you're about to pass on to them. so in about two months, round two begins and we will be asked to raise the debt ceiling. trust me, i don't want to default on our obligations, but in august of 2011, we borrowed $2.1 trillion because we ran out of money and 42 cents of every dollar we spend is borrowed money. if you don't keep borrowing, you will have to cut the government by 42%. nobody suggests that that's a good idea overnight. but here's what i won't do. i won't continue borrowing money unless we address in the process what got us into debt to begin with. so when we have to raise the debt ceiling again, i
with almost 12% of people out of work. crisis hit greece and spain edged with a quarter of the people jobless. in austria and germany, the unemployment rate is about 5%. it has been 164 days since julian assange seeked silence in ecuador. he is wanted for questioning in sweden over allegations of sexual assault, but the price tag has cost the taxpayer over $3 million. >> he is the man that shot to fame for selling state secrets when he website released confidential american cables. in 2010, to swedish women accused him of sex crimes. faced with extradition, he fled to the embassy saying the swedish authorities did not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running
're the only country that does it, let's be like france, greece, and spain and not have one and get to the cliff-- >> a quick reminder, by the way, adam of the 16 trillion dollars of debt that currently is on the table for the united states. 6 billion of that debt, neil, has been put on the books under president obama's watch. >> 6 trillion. >> 6 trillion. we're talking about adding on to that. where is he he coming up with the numbers? which economist is he citing and where are the polls-- >> warren buffett said earlier in the week it's not about economics it's about making people feel good. -- let me stop a second. did you say where he does he pull these numbers out of. >> seriously, seriously. >> neil: i wanted to make sure i heard you correctly. talk about a pain in the gas. the price is record high this time of year and we're getting new proposals to hike gasoline prices to pay down the debt. where will it go. the gang from forbes is on that. that's at the top of the hour. forget having the in-laws over for dinner, more families are shacking up together. young, old and everyone
real problem, the growing deficit on the path to greece, the goal gets worse once we kick the can away. that will be the overriding probleming not the slowing economy not people spending money, but sure, that might not happen in the first two months, but it will eventually happen if we keep kicking down the can. we want to prove to the world that we have a solution and if it takes a few months to get there and higher taxes for a while, big deal, we will get there. that's got to be the plan not just the same nonsense. >> yeah, but larry, that's part of your point, but jonas says we're not in a bad recession, we're certainly not in a good recovery. and if we just keep falling little bit by little bit, maybe as much as jump off the cliff, but it's certainly a slippery slope. >> brenda, the damage is already being done. we saw it in november retail sales and companies delaying activity already and we know the ratings agencies are minutes away, we're right to fix the problem in the long run than making a bandaid short-term deal. it doe't get recovery. >> we're going to get a bandaid deal an
olympic torchs and i carried it for san francisco. games los angeles, salt lake city, greece and china, beijing. i have them at home. it's a very good honor, four olympic torches. but maybe it's too much to talk about me. i was severely beat by one police officer, not physically, but morally. and this is more severe than physically, okay? i believe that this officer, maybe it will found for you strange, but i believe he is a racist and antisematic and maybe even a little fascist. first of all, he made that i am crazy, that i am a criminal, that i am crazy, that i am mad. and i am dangerous for myself and for my family and for people around me. this is what he wrote in official document. official, not just saying like this, but official document. i came to the chief of police and wrote a letter, nothing. i came to citizen complaint -- i said to them to prove that i am write. [speaker not understood] the office of civilian complaints said we will not bring that officer and i said without that officer i cannot prove anything. no. then i applied to ied chief of police and again, they tol
and greece top 25% with youth unemployment in both those countries near 60% news out of the midwest about the economy could bode well for today's national ism number. the chicago mni index---also known as known as pmi---shows a rating of 50.4 for november. a number above 50 indicates economic expansion. joining us now is alyce andres-frantz of chicago mni report. good morning. how are you summing up this latest report? are these numbers good enough? if you look at this report optically it looks very good. you have production up---employment tracking production. you have supplier deliveries lengthening and prices paid up big this month. when you take those four together you think wow this is a really great number but the big key here is new orders down. 5.3 plunging deeper into contraction at 45.3. it's the lowest level since june 2009. this is the biggest weight to this business barometer and this is the thing that held it down this month. you also have a situation this month where we have order backlogs up but still in contraction. it's just not a pretty picture when you have new orders
into the incident. workplace officials often fail to adequately enforce workplace safety standards. >> in greece, a bomb has exploded in an athens suburb. no one was hurt, but the explosion damaged adjacent businesses. some have called for banning the anti-immigrant party whose popularity has surged during the greek debt crisis. >> in belfast, protesters have clashed with police over plans to remove britain oppose the union jack flag from city hall. hundreds of protestant demonstrators attempted to storm the building after the majority catholic city voted to take it down. 15 police officers were injured. and these are testing times for a new push by the european union to reconcile serbia and its former southern province. >> although it has been almost five years since costs of a declared independence with western backing, tensions are just as high. still, there are optimists. we talk to the german commander of the nato-led peace keepers in the north of the country for more. >> our coverage begins. >> the bridge links the ethnic albanian and serve parts of the city appeared to this day, it is gua
is remarkably better, as well. here is his latest blue zone discovery. icaria, greece, here, people are more likely to reach their nineties, and older people have a third less chance of getting cancer. their minds are sharp, as well. compared to the united states, icaria has one quarter the rate of dementia. he wants to capture the formula so you and i can live longer. >> you know it captures the imagination, dan, for sure, welcome back to the show. >> a delight to be here. >> people always ask about this, they want to know what other people in other parts of the world know, let me start with the question, how much is genes, life-style? >> 80% is life-style and environment, which i think is really the important part. >> the thing that people point to here in the united states is stress. and it is a vague term, and means different things to different people. is -- stress here in the united states, obviously, we know what it is like. what is it like in other places? is there less stress, did you find for example in icaria? >> yes, you tell people you find this blue zone in the middle of of the
zone recovery. greece. people here are three times more likely to reach their 90s and older people have half the rate of heart diseasdisease. their minds stay sharp as well. america has one quarter the rate of dementia. he wants to capture that formula so you and i can live longer. >> you know, it captures the imagination, dan, for sure. welcome back to the back to th. people always ask about this, they want to know what do other people in other parts of the world know that we don't, how much of this is genes, and how much it lifestyle. >> 20% of how long the average person lives is genes, the other 80% is lifestyle and environment. >> the thing that people always point to in the united states is stress. it's a vague term, means different things to different people. is stress here in the united states, we obviously know what it's like, what is it like in other places, is there less stress, did you find? >> yes, you tell people you found a blue zone, and people think well if i lived in a place like that, i would not have stress, but they worry about their kids, finances, they worry abou
-debt nations like spain or greece, then you are probably going to see that safety play back off a little bit. > there are always places to park money. good to have you on the show this morning. have a great trading day. > > you too. if you're not yet fully awake this monday, here's one thing to open your eyes: after years of higher and higher coffee prices to consumers, brazil, which produces a third of the world's coffee, may turn prices around. a record crop there last year is being followed by another bumper crop. our cover story takes a look at what it means for coffee futures and retailers. brazil is expecting a record coffee crop again, just one year after its biggest harvest ever. "that would be a fabulous production." jack scoville, a commodities broker in chicago, says the bumper crop is the direct result of more coffee farms planted in brazil when a series of small crops drove prices high a couple of years ago. "it's because new trees and new areas are coming on." falling futures aren't great for investors, but may have coffee consumers buzzing. "if it's premium coffee, i'll buy a
or any american congress borrow anymore money until with fix this country from becoming greece. that requires significant entitlement reform to save social from bankruptcy and medicare from bankruptcy. social security is going bankrupt in about 20, 25 years. medicare is going bankrupt in 15 or 20 years. the baby boomers are coming in at 10,000 a day. and we just can't scene this. martha: president last week said we'll not play that game. last time around they wouldn't let the debt ceiling go up, i tell you right now, something to this effect we will play that game. >> we will play that game, mr. president. that is not a game. the game you're play something small ball. you're talking about raising rates on top 2% that would run the government for 11 days. you got reelected. how about doing something big that is not liberal? how about doing something big that is bipartisan. every big idea he has is a liberal idea that drowns us in debt. how been maing up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece? doing what boehner, tip o'n
, not only of traders -- if traders and investors look at greece today are watching the problems in italy. the news that mario monti will step down really dragged down the mood. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax closed just a tad out at 7530. the euro stoxx 50 ended the day almost 1/4 of 1% down. across the atlantic, the dow jones is currently going up just a tad. the euro is trading for 1.2934. >> 7.2 magnitude earthquake has struck off the coast of indonesia. reports saying it hit off shore of -- about 200 kilometers northwest of those islands. >> no tsunami warning has been issued. the usgs said the quake was reported at a depth of 158 kilometers. indonesia's's position within the ring of fire makes it prone to it -- indonesia's position within the ring of fire makes it prone to earthquakes. travelers have another nasty surprise waiting for them this morning -- and announced -- an unannounced strike by security workers. that caused several flights to be cancelled. >> frankfurt was particularly hard hit. today's strike complicated cleanup efforts from a recent b
at greece, but also they're watching the problems in italy. the news that mariom onti -- monti will step down. that's really dragging down the mood. >> let's look at some market numbers. dax closing up. stoxx 50 at 2624. the dow jones is currently up almost 1%. the euro is trading at $1.3007. >> agrees has reached their target in a bond buyback scheme, at least they are calling to the state tv. >> they bought the bonds at a discount of 70% from investors and the private banks. this was a condition for them to receive further eu funds. finance ministers are set to meet to discuss releasing the bailout funds. british banking giant hsbc has agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion to settle a money- laundering case. investigated by authorities in the united states. >> hsbc was accused of using the u.s. financial system to transfer funds from mexican drug cartels and from countries like iran that had been placed under international sanctions. >> the u.s. government says hsbc invaded these practices. they've have been said to enabled terrorists and others to ensure bent sanctions. despite the heft
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
agree come you both, do you agree with angela merkel's insistence on austerity for greece, spain and italy? >> austerity, yes. the definition of how much. but there's no way you can deal with that problem without a substantial degree of austerity in cases where they have excesses and bubbles and various parts of the economy and deficiencies. you can't sustainably bail them out without basically quid pro quo. on the other hand, let me say you can expect them to maintain austerity and less they're going to get -- that there will be some action. or within a definite period. and this is where kind of the rubber meets the road. everybody i think understands that, let's not call austerity, but you need very discipline policy by the borrower. unity willingness to lend on a part of the creditors. accreditors don't quite trust the borrower's. the borrowers don't quite trust the creditors that they will provide the money. so they don't do this on a grand scale. they do it, comes to kind of a, they differ too much. say, we'll go in for another three months. then a few months later they come
you do is say, we are in trouble, we will borrow in loans and give it to people. that is called greece. that is what the trade minister said. they are not serious about welfare, the deficit, or a serious party. everybody can see it. >> order. >> double very much. will the prime minister join me and the whole crowd in sending our condolences -- we urge anybody who wants to donate to the king edward the seventh memorial fund. >> i am sure the whole house and indeed the whole country will join the honorable lady and join me in paying tribute to this nurse and giving all our sympathies. she clearly loved her job, loved her work, cared deeply about health of her patients, and what has happened is a complete tragedy. there are many lessons that will need to be learned. i echo what she said about what in the press keep their distance. >> is the prime minister still intending to introduce to snooper's chartaer? does he realize that he will be spying and more people in britain than even all the press barons put together? did -- where did he get his advice and ideas from? >> i really believe on
to bring an umbrella with you. meanwhile, into greece and italy though, thunderstorm activity firing up across this area. it will start to pull off to the east. for the time being, continued to linger. the storms continue to fire up. as far as temperatures into the east, moscow, minus 14 for your high. further to west berlin, 4. a mild 8 and 9 in london and paris. here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> and that concludes this edition of "newsline." i'm keikichi hanada. we'll be back at the top of the hour. thank you for joining us on nhk world. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
european countries. the gender gap in pay is smallest in greece and norway. the researchers say one reason for the gender gap as many women work in poorly paid part-time jobs. that also affect retirement pensions. the gender gap among retirees is bigger in germany than in any other developed country. one possible solution, experts say, is more child care opportunities. she left her career -- stayed with it because of child care options offered by her company. >> calling for nationwide protests next week following the first round of voting on the new constitution in germany -- in egypt. 56% voted in favor of the draft. >> they are complaining of numerous voting irregularities and are declaring every count. they say it paves the way for islamic law and as a threat to the christian minority as well as civil rights. official referendum results will only be known after a second round of voting next weekend. the german government has expressed concern over the situation in egypt. >> the minister for development said an unstable egypt would be a security risk for the entire region. he said, "the
government privatisation plans. and and greece, civil servants have gone on a 24-hour price against job cuts. many public services were disrupted in the capital. >>> in south korea, voters have elected their first female president, who follows in the footsteps of her father who was also president. she is vowing to batter the economy. >> she has occupied a place on the national stage since the early 20's, but this is something new. if just before midnight, in freezing temperatures in central seoul, she addressed her supporters and the nation as the first female president elect. >> i will be the people's president who keeps promises to the citizens. this is the year of happiness we have all been waiting for. >> south korea remains a male- dominated society. just half of the working age women still have a job. if some see this as a transformative moment. >> there has been a glass ceiling in this society. with a woman president, took that we will demonstrate our troop qualities. >> i admit defeat, but it is just my defeat, not not that of others who are hoping to have a new government. i congrat
's reacting, at some point we will become greece, there aren't any more hypothesis. >> charles, why are they still relatively calm? i think they're relatively calm because of what charlie said. the markets believe we will get a deal. the leadership is trying to get a deal, but it's not easy and by the way by the way-- >> adam, adam. >> charlie, not the end of the world. >> markets like short-term fixes, too. and just because-- >> markets like money printing and. >> neil: by the way, i know i might offend some of you market enthusiasts here, but markets can be wrong and markets might be satisfied. >> they're always wrong. >> neil: a short-term gift and remember the first tarp vote rejected and the market fell about 800 points and run back together and get a deal going and the market ends up being 4,000 points lower a few months later. so, ben, my worry is basing everything you do on a market selloff. >> well, the markets are always wrong, neil because they change the next day or the next hour. and for long periods of time, they have a modest degree of predicted value. >> neil: would
and transportation workers have staged a 24-hour strike in the greek capital. strikes have become frequent in greece since public spending has been cut to meet conditions for international bailout funding. >> iraq's president has arrived for medical treatment following a stroke. few details have been released about the seriousness of his condition. he is seen as a unifying force in iraq, mediating among sunnis, shia, and kurds. >> protesters in several indian cities are calling for action to stop the increasing number of violent rapes of women, following the rape and beating of a 23-year-old by six men on a bus in new delhi. doctors say the young woman is still in critical condition. >> christmas is, of course, just around the corner, and many retailers have been targeting customers, looking for that last-minute gift. and then there is this -- how about a personal shopper when you are at the airport? >> sounds good. as it turns out in frankfurt, germany, there is one, and he is especially looking to help out an increasing number of travelers from china, who are looking to part with lots of cash. >>
of the year of crisis with a steady hand. she has stuck to her goals in 2012 -- to save the euro and greece without compromising germany's financial stability. >> how alive is the concept of charity? we bring you an example from mexico. >> first, some of the stories making news. japan has a new prime minister, voted in by the lower house of parliament earlier today. his liberal democratic party won by a landslide in polls earlier this month. he has vowed to introduce aggressive monetary policies and says he wants to revise japan's pacifist constitution. >> china has launched the world's longest high-speed rail route. the line between cities is almost 2,900 kilometers long. trains travel an average speed of 300 kilometers per hour, cutting travel time in half to just eight hours. >> floods in malaysia have forced more than 13,000 people to flee their homes. the floods have hit several states of the country's east coast. one woman died after slipping into a swollen river, and forecasters are expecting more rain to fall. >> china's leading producer of rare earth is attempting to shut down some
would be some many would love to have. >> austerity programs have put people in places like greece, spain, and portugal in jeopardy. some families are having trouble putting a enough food are in the table. a lot of food gets thrown away. >> sabina has a lot of cleaning the to do. the food in her pantry is safe to eat, and bring in a way seems like a waste. the solution? food sharing. >> i often by more than i can eat. now i'm going on holiday and there will be no one to eat them, happy to share. >> anyone can donate items they don't want to throw away. a kilogram of fruit, gingerbread cake, cookies. for sabina, it is a way to help neighbors. heike's boys enjoy apples. those interested can sign up online. >> you have to have the right attitude. other people would throw this food away. >> most people find it hard to find the right amount. more often than not, they buy too much. on average, a german household throws away 80 kg of food per year. the film "tast the the waste" looks at this. the director is the creator of food sharing. >> we wanted to do more than just save a few heads o
in new york city. trek through the himalayas for $400. explore the secret gardens of greece. these are all with locals. what these companies are doing, they're enabling people who have jobs that they love and they have different hobbies to actually make money by showing this to other people. i spoke with all the entrepreneurs that started these companies and they kept saying happiness is about the memories, something can you give on the holidays. >> anything involving food is okay with me. thank you very much, lori. >>> you've probably been hearing christmas music for a few weeks now. but you probably haven't heard this. the beautiful sounds of celtic woman. these singers have something special. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. [ tylenol bottle ] me
have been gathering to make flowers and teddy bears. it is a focus of this community's greece. my colleague is up outside sandy hook elementary school with us now. that memorial, i visited yesterday morning and this evening. it is really extraordinary have people have wanted to come there to express their sadness about what happened. >> people are coming here now. they're coming to lay flowers. there are christmas trees here. there are trees for all of the children who were killed and he will not say christmas day. this one is focused on avielle richman. she loved to ride horses. she loved to color her "harry potter"coloring book. these trees are california grown. she had recently moved here from the other side of the country. you can see that people are coming to light candles. they're coming to lay flowers. they are also coming most poignantly with teddy bears. every tree has a group of soft toys for the departed child. this really is a most agonizing week. two funerals took place together. there are many more to come. >> laura, i saw earlier a crossed that had come all the way
in greece this week over the massacre of innocents, but agreeing how to prevent such killings in the future is bound to divide the country for months to come. >> our north america editor reporting. here in washington today, there was a major announcement regarding president obama's cabinet. massachusetts senator john kerry was nominated to be the next secretary of state. after confirmation, the former presidential candidate will succeed hillary clinton to serve as america's top diplomat. so what can we expect from him in that role? for answers, i spoke to the former u.s. state department spokesman. of course, americans united nations ambassador, susan rice, was the top favorite. how effective will john kerry be? >> he has great spirits. in a sense, the obama administration has used him very effectively in the past four years. he was first on the ground in copenhagen with the climate change negotiations. he was inserted into the troubled relationship the united states has with pakistan. he has had effective conversations with president karzai, and he did some yeoman's work when it came to ne
bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched the numbers. exercise regularly and you could save up to 30% on medical care costs. quit smoking and the average savings is $2,000 on cigarettes. give up a 10-ounce bag of potato chips in your lunch and save more than $600 in the coming year. still to come, what corporations can learn from 2012 mishaps. a look back at the biggest blunders later on in the show. and, how to squeeze more from your personal finances in 2013 is just ahead with bill moller, after this "in the know" message. from a peronsal finance perspective, what do you suppose is in store in the new year? let me guess - higher taxes? that's one of many things that will be chaning. gail marks jarvis is a personal finance columnist. she's also the author o
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